Books

Sheetal Prasad has it all: youth, beauty, wealth and education.  But when this modern, Indian woman surrenders love for honor and marries into India’s titanic ‘royal family’, these very advantages turn against her and she is stripped of her freedom.

Meet the Dhanraj’s—a powerful family bound together by a web of lies where infidelity, greed, secrets and hidden identities lurk beneath the lush tapestry.  The Dhanraj’s have plenty to hide and will do what it takes to mask the truth from the world.

As Sheetal peels back the layers of deceit, she confronts a haunting reality and is threatened by the blazes of passion she ignited.

 

 “A compelling glimpse into clashing influences affecting the wealthy in modern Indian culture, Duty and Desire offers intrigue, romance and growing spiritual awakening.” – New York Times Best Selling Author, Haywood Smith.

“A story of love in modern India–rich, complex, and beautifully told.” – Jade Lee, USA Today Bestselling Author.

Duty and Desire draws the reader into a culture of fascinating contradictions. A moving story of a girl’s transition to womanhood while forced to choose between family and self.”  — Shobhan Bantwal, award-winning author of The Dowry Bride.

Duty and Desire immerses us in the larger-than-life, decadent world of modern India’s ultra-wealthy families—a place sizzling with secrets and lies, love and betrayal. An intriguing, compulsive read.”                — Anjali Banerjee, author of Haunting Jasmine and Invisible Lives.

“Contrary to stereotypical portrayals of Indians, Gattani’s characters offer a glimpse into the lives and lifestyles of the super wealthy.  The author, however, manages to weave the elaborate descriptions within the confines of the storyline so it never feels deliberate or forced… there is plenty of room for universal appeal… The highly apt and befitting cover packages Duty and Desire into a desirable read, indeed.”            — NRI Pulse (April 2012)

The premise of “Duty and Desire” sounds inviting for a summer read… many women will at least be able to relate to some degree to the main female  character’s transition from independent single woman to married woman who must  consider how her actions may affect her relationships within her new family.  Through their similarities, readers may be drawn in to learn about  their differences.         — Danbury News Times (May 31, 2012)

“I wasn’t prepared to love it like I did. The pacing and the plot, the characterization and the conflict, the storytelling and the setting and sexual tension were impeccable. I didn’t want to put it down.”                       — The Petit Fours and Hot Tamales.

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